What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

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What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:46 pm

Hi.

Just testing Joomla 1.7 and while browsing all the extensions we use for our non-profit/charitable organization, one thing comes to my mind: what happened to all those great non-commercial extensions, which made Joomla so great years ago?

It seems, that most of the extensions have turned commercial.

That may mean, that private users and non-profit organizations will find it hard or even impossible to customize their site for their specific needs - indeed, this is what we are seeing. We can't shell out any money for our non-profit website, because we have none.

And I don't believe, we are the only one.

I really love Joomla. I use it personally and for several organizational websites since it has been called "Mambo".
And one great argument for Mambo and then Joomla has always been the great pool of free and great extensions.

Until some time ago it has always been like that: you could use an extension for non-profit use for free, but if you wanted it for a for-profit website, you had to pay. And there were options for donations. Or backlinks. Or limited and unlimited versions.

But now I browse the extensions directory and it seems, at least 50% is paid-only. And in many cases not even paid versions with unpaid siblings. Some functionality can only be added via a paid extension.

This is sad and discourraging. When will this end? Where will this end?

Best regards,
Ricardo Cristof
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by amitray » Sat Dec 24, 2011 4:27 pm

The developers are like you. Most of them freelancers feeding their family by making and selling their extensions. Imagine the hardwork they did and in return sometimes we remove the backlinks too without paying anything to them just because it is GPL licensed.
After all you are getting Joomla for free only. Then why not try develop extension doing a little hardwork going through a PHP and Joomla book and make own extensions.
I myself had a donation link on my site for more than three years and infact its still there. You know how much I got absolute "zero". if you need something you have to work hard for it. From a piece of bread to a limousine everything needs hard work.
So my friend instead of looking for free extensions try making one of yours. You will start loving it and strive to make more and more.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:15 pm

Sorry, I work as a human rights activist - unpaid since 4 years, so...
But, no, I can't code.

Well, phpbb, Wordpress, Drupal etc. were all around there for years and most of the extensions for the other plattforms remain free of charge and their communities still live happily. The same was true for Mambo/Joomla some years ago.
But is has changed here, the culture, the spirit has changed. :-(

At least, this is my feeling.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Webdongle » Sat Dec 24, 2011 9:40 pm

rcristofrf wrote:Sorry, I work as a human rights activist - unpaid since 4 years, so...
...
How do you eat and pay the bills ?

As for the 'non-commercial spirit of Joomla' it is still abundant you only need to see the Bug Tracker for that. As for the Joomla extensions we need the commercial ones because many people need the option to use extensions with some kind of customer service. There are not as many non-commercial extensions for 1.7 but it is still early days. And those who write the non-commercial extensions can not afford to spend all their time developing them.

A good example is Virtuemart, it has recently been released for 1.7 and a lot of effort went in to it. The non-commercial extensions are becoming more prolific now.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:18 am

I have to agree strongly with amitray on this one. It seems the old "spirit" of community-driven/developed software is struggling in the face of a worsening economic climate. Or maybe it's a lack of respect from the freeloaders who take the generously given product, install it on their websites, and do everything in their power to conceal the source of who poured hours of love into building the software.

Yes, it's a small price to pay for free software that merely displays a backlink on the sites where it's installed, only to have that tiny opportunity for a bit of recognition thwarted by a miserable few who remove the backlinks and deny the developers their few milliseconds of public exposure.

So I say this to those who live in the hope that freely available and available-for-free extensions will become the mainstream in the Joomla community: show your support for those who create their software rather than criticise them for the reasons they may have to convert their business model into something else.
Last edited by sozzled on Fri Dec 30, 2011 12:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Webdongle » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:40 am

sozzled wrote:... Or maybe it's a lack of respect from the freeloaders who take the generously given product, install it on their websites, and do everything in their power to conceal the source of who poured hours of love into building the software.
...
+1
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Thu Dec 29, 2011 10:59 am

@webdongle: I live by the charity of my girlfriend, formerly other relatives and have just spent my complete pension money. Believe it or not: a lot of people who run non-profit activists sites (that i know of) have merely enough to eat and pay rent by small social care or precarious jobs, but live on donated hardware, webspace and everything else, that goes beyond basic bodily needs.

Oh my... so.. if I respect back links and the effort of developers, but have absolutely no money to spend, I am more and more screwed with Joomla, right?

So again: why no back links, donations and limited free/paid full versions?

And: why does this model work well in other communities?
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:06 am

addition: why no paid versions for commercial use and unpaid versions for non-profit use?

I do not believe, that free versions are killing income. This was wrong with ebooks and with music, as studies and several examples show: people are willing to pay, when it is not mandatory, so free distribution supports generating income. Why shouldn't this model work with joomla extensions?

Speaking for me: I donate, when I have money, but I do not remove decent back links, when I don't.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by arthurhanlon » Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:23 pm

I'm sorry, I fully agree with rcristofrf on this one. I've been with Joomla since it's fork from Mambo and have seen a fundamental shift in both the attitude in the community and the whole ethos of Joomla itself.

What made Joomla great for me at the start was the fact that there were so many well written plugins and extensions that would allow me to build a feature rich site. If I come across a great plugin/extension that I loved and found myself using over and over then yes, I would donate (and usually it was a per site constructed donation not just a one off) because, at the end of the day, someone spent a lot of time and effort producing the extensions I used.

This switch to a majority of commercial plugins made me look elsewhere and I had been interested in Drupal for a while and liked their whole attitude (very similar to what Joomla was at the start) so made the switch and have built my last few sites on this platform.

Companies like Red Hat and Acquia have a very solid existence based on offering SERVICES centred around their respective platforms so there is no reason why this model could not continue to function well within the Joomla community.

Even looking at a company like RocketTheme that has launched something as awesome as the Gantry Framework continues to offer it free but still makes money selling templates written on top of it. They even maintain and release updates to it as ultimately, this benefits their own business whilst allowing others to benefit from their research and work. They could quite easily have sold this product and would probably have made a fair amount from it's sales.

The point I am trying to illustrate here is the shift in the Joomla community and whilst it's down to the individual developers what they choose to do with their work, I feel that this switch has been detrimental to Joomla overall and has certainly left me looking elsewhere for others platforms and has also had me considering developing my own CMS framework.

These are simply my opinions and I don't wish to start a flame war here.

Arthur

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by abernyte » Thu Dec 29, 2011 3:13 pm

Come on Arthur, do I detect the rose tinted longing for a bygone age? If we are honest the quality and variety of the extensions, post Mambo, while great at the time was not near the quality of the breadth and reach of those we use now.
The development cycle being so much faster too, in many cases, I can appreciate that it is the commercial extensions success that will breed the free version. With J1.6/J1.7 morphing into J2.5 happening at breakneck speed we are just entering the phase whereby the stability of the new LTR will allow the room for the next gen free extensions.
I note you have turned to Drupal, which is a worthy CMS for what it does but like Wordpress they can hardly be described as the poor relations begging on a street corner.
Modern CMS's require funding to succeed on the 'toobs today. Joomla is playing it's hand well at a tough table. IMHO!
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by arthurhanlon » Thu Dec 29, 2011 3:38 pm

Of course, doesn't everyone dream of days gone by? ;)

I appreciate your points and the fact that cash money funding does breed a higher quality of extension BUT, there was a ton of passionate people right at the start wanting to contribute whatever they could to improve their platform of choice and I feel that this has somewhat dwindled over my time with Joomla.

With regards to Drupal, I have not jumped ship and will never evangelise one platform over another. Each have their merits and each have their drawbacks but what a platform it would be if the functionalities of the 2 were merged...I drool even at the thought. So much power in each platform and yet still so much more to do. I will use whichever platform best suits the task at hand which I think would offend some of the purists but as pointed out, each has their own set of benefits.

I have noticed the rapid style development cycle that Joomla has adopted and one of the reasons I have come back is that I am a "Joomla boy" through and through and do love the platform itself and was quite curious to see what new features have been introduced in 1.7. I look forward to seeing the release of 2.5 too so that I can update my 1.5 sites to the next LTR. I'm also a bit of a framework nut using things like CodeIgniter and FuelPHP and love the fact that we now have the Jooma Framework separated out to use standalone.

Joomla has certainly built up a bit of momentum over the past few years but I fear it may be rolling a little too fast for it's own good. In saying that, it's got a good percentage of the web under it's belt and it'll be good to see where the machine is driven next.

Thanks for your reply Abernyte and as always, these are just my personal views on the topic.

Arthur

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:16 pm

rcristofrf wrote:Why no paid versions for commercial use and unpaid versions for non-profit use?

I do not believe that free versions are killing income. This was wrong with ebooks and with music, as studies and several examples show: people are willing to pay, when it is not mandatory, so free distribution supports generating income. Why shouldn't this model work with joomla extensions?

Speaking for me: I donate, when I have money, but I do not remove decent back links, when I don't.
I'm pleased to hear that, in your case, you respect the original authors to leave their products alone and not remove the backlinks to their sites. As I wrote earlier, perhaps much of this erosion-in-spirit syndrome that we're discussing in not merely a repercussion targeted at those who wilfully remove those backlinks. To add insult to injury, many of these people not only remove the backlinks, they also clog the developers' forums with dozens of questions demanding support!

I don't think it's merely a case of justifying substantial discounts for those who run charity sites. We hear a lot of "crying poor" these days - not just from the site users but also from the software developers, too. In the beginning I believe that a lot of Joomla's success was driven by synergy and a symbiotic relationship between Joomla core developers, extension builders and members of the community-at-large. It's unfortunate, perhaps, that a kind of parasitic element has crept into some quarters but I am still fairly optimistic that this is not the mainstream. If there's an erosion of the non-commercial spirit then there are many causes for it; the fault does not, in my opinion, lie at the doorstop of Joomla developers and I think it's unfair to suggest that avarice is the principal motive.

Let me also add that, in addition to those who use free-of-charge software, there are a lot of people who derive an income out of using free-of-charge software and not a single cent of it is returned to the original developer. People make money from free software in many ways: there are those who build sites for others who charge people for their time; there are those who build their own sites and charge others to join them. In addition to the software that is available free of cost, these people also impose on Joomla developers' time by asking questions on their support forums. I wonder if anyone has considered this, too?
Last edited by sozzled on Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by therealkickers » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:33 pm

Just my 2 cents:

I have been working on our web project since May 2011. I have downloaded and tried about 30 modules, components or plugins.

I *always* prefer the free ones, but I also *always* donated from 5 to 30$ for each free component that we finally installed on or website. No matter if we were allowed to remove backlinks or autor infos or not.

I have bought 4 commercial extensions, three of them being different Ajax Chats. I have spent days and weeks to make them run on our Joomla site. After the first one finally failed to do its job I have received my money back, because not even the developers could tell why the modules wouldn't run.
Before buying the second and third one, I have contacted their developers *before* downloading, asking them to check via a temp. super user account if the modules are going to work. They tested, they told it's gonna work, we paid for and downloaded the extensions but they didn't work. Again, none of the developers could tell us why.

Why do I tell this?
Because I have not had a single free extension that was declared to run on J1.6 and that finally didn't run. Some of them were crap for sure, but they all ran / run.
From 4 commercial extensions only one runs (CB 1.7 including modules), bu also here we have had issues to be solved by extra efforts from the CB support team.

Whenever I stumble over an assumable useful extension and I see "commercial", I close the site and go back the the Extension directory to find a free alternative.

Better free and donating afterwards than paying before and regretting it. Although I have to say we got our money back in every case things didn't work out they should.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by nicholash » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:48 pm

Why, because you will find the model does not work.

You might find that the people who were so free with their time in building components had companies that basically paid for their time to work on it. A bit like you have people supporting you. When the times have turned hard, those companies are not supporting the same.

Donations do not work, back links do not work. People have to start charging.

If you take a good look drupal is following suit with paid components, word press is there as well.

You could always contact the developers and see if they could donate you a free license.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:57 pm

This is a wonderful discussion topic but I think we should be careful about going down rabbit-holes by implying that commercial software is of a better quality than non-commercial software. Most software developed these days is created because someone had a particular need for something and was prepared to pay for it to be built.

There are products that work and products that don't. Any merchant who sells a product that doesn't work would be risking their reputation by refusing to refund the price in full to an unsatisfied customer. Therefore, I don't think those kinds of comparisons are necessarily useful in a topic like this one.

I sympathise with the opening comment: it seems that there's been a steady decline in the number of non-commercial Joomla extensions. I also think there are reasons, not necessarily motivated by developers' greed, that are responsible for that decline.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by abernyte » Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:28 am

sozzled wrote: I also think there are reasons, not necessarily motivated by developers' greed, that are responsible for that decline.
I greatly fear that we are seeing the erosion of the distinction between " free as in speech - not free as in beer". We have witnessed a generation of feckless squandering of financial resources funded on fantasy economics and unmanaged debt. Now that the chickens are well and truly home and roosting we do not seem to be able to focus so clearly on the fundamental meaning of freedom.
Not having to pay for an extension is not freedom.
To return to the OP, I would be interested to learn what extensions outside of the Joomla Core that he must have that he cannot source in an non commercial alternative.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Tue Jan 03, 2012 5:52 pm

I disagree. Not having to pay (with money) for something is a part of freedom. That's why access to shelter, clean water, nutrition etc. are basic human rights (although far too often not granted).

The concept, that everything must have a price (in money) is wrong. This concept has led to the growing gap between rich and poor, to the financial crisis itself.

However, the internet a decade ago, as well as other projects/communities has proven, that not everything, which has a value, must cost a price (in money).

I believe, a cooperative/colaborative society could one day overturn "basic" rules of money to close the gap and disempower the "1%", if I may use this simplified term.

I always thought, Open Source could be a tool of empowerment for the people, coded by idealists. But monetarizing from OSS towards regular people does undermine this idea.

That is what I meant with the spirit I am missing. However, this spririt, creating collaborative tools, thus supporting free speech, may be still alive in other communities.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by nicholash » Tue Jan 03, 2012 8:42 pm

rcristofrf wrote:I disagree. Not having to pay (with money) for something is a part of freedom. That's why access to shelter, clean water, nutrition etc. are basic human rights (although far too often not granted).
And sometimes called stealing as well. If it is not stealing then this is from generosity of person who is giving up something to another person for their benefit
rcristofrf wrote:The concept, that everything must have a price (in money) is wrong. This concept has led to the growing gap between rich and poor, to the financial crisis itself.
I thought the financial crisis was because of greed, not about things costing money.

If nothing has a price, then do you value anything?

If you take the rich out of the equation for a sec, and just look at the poor. Are they better off now then they were 10, 50, 100 years ago?

Are they getting worse or better? I believe they are better in general (maybe that is just in western countries). If they are getting better, but the rich are getting there faster (why the gap is getting wider). Is that not an unfair comparison setting your self up for being upset?
rcristofrf wrote:However, the internet a decade ago, as well as other projects/communities has proven, that not everything, which has a value, must cost a price (in money).

I believe, a cooperative/colaborative society could one day overturn "basic" rules of money to close the gap and disempower the "1%", if I may use this simplified term.

I always thought, Open Source could be a tool of empowerment for the people, coded by idealists. But monetarizing from OSS towards regular people does undermine this idea.
A lot of idealism, but unfortunately there has to be business fundamentals for things to actually work well.

http://www.paulgraham.com/good.html

a good article, you can still be good and make money. Making money is not bad. Greed and being selfish is.
rcristofrf wrote:That is what I meant with the spirit I am missing. However, this spririt, creating collaborative tools, thus supporting free speech, may be still alive in other communities.
There can be creating collaborative tools, helping people still exist when people are still making money.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Mariascc » Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:24 pm

I was not around in the early days, and frankly I am super new. (I have only used 1.7) but is it me or is this exactly what began to happen to myspace when joomla was in the middle of its golden years? I think that we should try to accept the fact that things change and if you want it a certain way you have to do your part. I understand that not having money is a major letdown when alot of extensions are commercial now...but to me they still have many highly useful free extensions that do the job for me. I do not need loads of extensions to make a high quality site. If we are to complain about anything not being free anymore try digging for a template that works with joomla and allows full editing (minus backlinks). I finally found one after a week and a half of searching. Most of the free templates now have a catch unlike the early days of CMS. This is my insight and opinion though ;)
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Mariascc » Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:31 pm

rcristofrf wrote:
However, the internet a decade ago, as well as other projects/communities has proven, that not everything, which has a value, must cost a price (in money).

I believe, a cooperative/colaborative society could one day overturn "basic" rules of money to close the gap and disempower the "1%", if I may use this simplified term.

I always thought, Open Source could be a tool of empowerment for the people, coded by idealists. But monetarizing from OSS towards regular people does undermine this idea.
I say stop buying from the 1% and stop supporting them! I NEVER buy from places like walmart. I buy from local grocery marts. etc. I believe that if the imbalance is bothering you, stop being greedy by shopping at the cheapest places (1%) and start buying local as much as you can..yes you will spend more money. but to me that is a very very small price versus a corporate controlled country. Take the power out of their hands and stop buying from them for the worlds sake!
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Thu Jan 05, 2012 10:46 am

Mariascc wrote:I say stop buying from the 1% and stop supporting them! (...)
Word. *thumbs up*
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Thu Jan 05, 2012 7:29 pm

I'm sorry but I think rcristofrf has confused his understanding of the free-market - "free" in the sense of open, unrestricted or self-regulating - and simple economics. If everything was free, if the world's governments ran as a charity, the world would be a basket case of anarchy. Anyway, I'm not here to debate rcristofrf's off-topic analogies. I'm here simply to present my views in response to the topic: What has happened to the "non-commercial" spirit of Joomla?

First and foremost, I disagree with the premise that Joomla (core and extension development) has turned to the "dark side" of rank commercialism. There are many examples where the generous free spirit - "free" in the sense of generously donated - still exists. Many, many examples. The Joomla core, itself, is one such example where the hard work, the dedication and the tireless efforts of hundreds of hobbyists, enthusiasts, volunteers and professionals have contributed to creating a product in response to the demands of millions of people around the world, 99.9% of whom have never once got off their rear-ends to help anyone else.

Nothing in life is free. If you want something, if you value something, you have to work for it. Joomla is not a three-mouseclicks-and-you're-done solution to webcraft. Joomla requires understanding, patience and effort. To those who think that they can create a website without these things, I say "you're dreaming." Some people can't understand, don't have the skill, don't have the time and lack the patience. That's OK. But if you don't have these things then you can't, at the same time, demand that others should simply jump to your aid just because you're incapable of helping yourself. I mean, there has to be some kind of quid pro quo here.

Getting back to the topic, I disagree with the premise that Joomla and those who "profit" from it are principally motivated by commercial self-interests. I am strongly of the opinion (and I'm not being "rose-tintedly" optimistic) that there is still a vibrant generosity that exists within the Joomla community. I'm not here to push my own barrow, but the community in which I spend most of my time is one that has benefited from both volunteers and paid sponsorship (and more of the former than the latter).

Perhaps there are more extensions on the JED these days that are "commercial"; that may be true. But let's not conclude that because there may be a rise in the number of commercial extensions this will mean the demise of Joomla as an open source, freely available and free-to-use basis for web development, either.
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Amen to that! Some of the best examples of websites that you see around the 'net to today, are those that are based on no-frills, "vanilla-flavoured" unmodified Joomla with no added extensions at all!

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by rcristofrf » Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:12 pm

@sozzled: Well, In regard of the definition of words like "value": so you wouldn't considering credits/backlinks as a form of value or at least a form of generating value for the developers? Especially in situations, when the developer offers limited or for-non-commercial-use versions and full/commercial versions.

However, speaking for a charitable non-profit with absolutely no budget, we are hit by the increasing lack of free extensions in several specific fields.

If this becomes a trend (and as a long-time user it already feels like that), we will have to switch to Drupal or alike more early than not - even if it is more complex to maintain.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Madzell » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:24 pm

This post is an indication of what is wrong with our society. EVERYONE feels they are OWED something just for being alive.
I for one is greatfull for programs Like Joomla, and those who make the exetensions. Those that cost and those that do not. If I cannot afford pay for extensions... I dont use them. Alot of work goes into coding and people deserve to get something for their hard work.
Yes I am a horrible person because I think people who are asking for something should have to give something to get it.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Mon Jan 16, 2012 7:54 pm

rcristofrf wrote:@sozzled: Well, In regard of the definition of words like "value": so you wouldn't considering credits/backlinks as a form of value or at least a form of generating value for the developers? Especially in situations, when the developer offers limited or for-non-commercial-use versions and full/commercial versions.
What I was trying to say is that there seems to be a growing number of people who have devalued the work of Joomla developers. One of the ways that people devalue the work of others is to obfuscate, or deliberately remove, links from software so that no credit is given to the people who did all the hard work in building those extensions.

If people don't value the work of others - those who have, in the past, developed Joomla software and shared it with the Joomla community for free - by paying them the compliment of a small, public credit for the work then what other value can you put on such software if not a monetary value? But, in the end there is no inherent evil in profit whether someone profits financially or reputably.

Let's return to the original question: "What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?" For the most part, I think that end-users have devalued the altruism of many Joomla extension developers and it's a case of "what goes around, comes around".

We all have to live within the limits of our budgets otherwise you'll become an economic basket-case (e.g. like several European countries we could name). We do understand that some commercial entrepreneurs could show more leeway towards not-for-profit users but, just as there have to be limits on profligate spending, there have to be limits on profligate charity, too.

When you say that you are faced by "the increasing lack of free extensions in several specific fields", I repeat what I wrote last time: some of the best examples of websites that you see today are those that are based on no-frills, "vanilla-flavoured" unmodified Joomla with no added extensions at all!
Last edited by sozzled on Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:36 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by nogindrill » Mon Jan 16, 2012 8:13 pm

I agree with the original Poster. I have noticed fewer non-commercial extensions available. I have paid for several and will continue to do so. But am concerned as Joomla continue to develop and grow, the number of free extensions will diminish.

:(

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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Sun Jan 22, 2012 8:23 pm

If you look at the most popular extensions on the JED - see http://extensions.joomla.org/extensions/popular - of the top 20 that are listed, the first 19 are all non-commercial ones. In fact, of the 100 extensions listed on those pages, all but 15 of them are non-commercial extensions. That means that 85% of the most popular extensions on the JED are non-commercial extensions. So I wonder what the fuss is all about anyway?
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Webdongle » Sun Jan 22, 2012 10:02 pm

sozzled wrote:....That means that 85% of the most popular extensions on the JED are non-commercial extensions. ....
But that is not relative to the proportion of commercial to non commercial extensions. That just shows that most of us won't shell out for a commercial version.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by sozzled » Tue Jan 24, 2012 11:55 pm

@webdongle: Can you provide some details about the overall proportion of commercial vs. non-commercial Joomla extensions available on the JED, please? In the absence of firm data, we only have this hearsay evidence that there's been a shift, a decline, in the availability of and, by inference, motivation by Joomla developers to build, non-commercial extensions for Joomla.
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Re: What happened to the non-commercial spirit of Joomla?

Post by Oaksong » Wed Jan 25, 2012 1:21 am

Part of it is that since Joomla came out Wordpress and Drupal have both improved tremendously and have way easier to deal with code bases and more user friendly interfaces. I never hear developers talking about Joomla here, it is all drupal and wordpress.

Having done work on a custom component for Joomla... I wouldn't deal with it for free either.


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